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Date: 14 December 2013. Christmas Aboard 2013.

This is my fifth Christmas aboard Seaweed, and it is still more fun each passing year. The decorations are up, almost all the Christmas cards sent, and life is indeed good afloat. Of course over the years I've made a few mistakes especially regarding my tree which has crashed spectacularly, twice. If nothing else, sometimes I require lessons more than one time. Glue is a wonderful thing, don't 'cha know!

The thing is, like all women first the tree goes up, then I arrange the branches so it looks a bit like a tree. This artificial tree is at least 30 years old. She's a little two footer, and although it fits well next to my spare wind generator blades it does get squished for most of the year. After the tree is plumped up then lights are strung followed by the garlands. THEN, a very important event occurs:

Yes, the critical event is taping securely a candle-stick holder also known as the tree stand to my dinette. Years ago (back in my dirt dweller days) I would simply drill a hole in a chunk of wood  and call it good. Aboard a boat however we are concerned with weight and a chunk of wood serving no purpose other than holding a tree upright would not be considered wise. Thus the candlestick holder aka tree stand was chosen. Plus I think it looks pretty.

As you can tell, my tree has an eclectic group of not-really-ornaments displayed. The tree is more a jaunt down Memory Lane versus your more standard Christmas balls, bells and such. I like it and it's fun to share a bit about the various items with friends and visitors to Seaweed:
 

When travel to Havana was opened in 1975, a trip to there netted a small bottle of Cuban Rum. Later the lid found its way to my tree. The worry doll was made by ladies for me in Guatemala back in the 60's. You give your worries to the doll and she will take the burden. Yes, I'm a confirmed Trekkie, though alas, this year my Voyager ornament did not light up. Still, it is hanging from the branches near a Borg cube.


I have a long garland with bells strung in my pilothouse windows.
When the boat rocks or the wind blows they make a pretty sound.

Remember when we all had these carolers? The girl has a bell. They came from our boat and are a few decades old. The lighthouse has a red and green light at the top with Mickey in a sleigh and the gang riding reindeer. It was a $2 find at a yard sale this year and will be passed along to my daughter for her home.

Of course any gal worth her sea-salt has a tugboat. It was from Lowe's Hardware a few years back and lights up with three AAA batteries. The little rowboat in front of the whale is one I gave to my grandma in the 60's. When she passed it was given back to me. Wasn't that nice that she had notes under all the curios in her cabinet so we could all have a memory returned?

Back in 1993 I found Santa's Workshop at a Kmart and loved it. If you look carefully on the wall behind Santa's desk you'll see a reindeer head mounted. I guess that's what happens when they start to slow down! 

Anyway, the tree is filled with memories -- not so much "ornaments" per se, but bits and pieces of life. Each year I allow myself the privilege of finding a single ornament -- price is no object, just something that pleases me. Some years I find nothing, and others maybe one or two. It's an indulgence that gives me pleasure and really, just because it isn't an ornament-ornament, doesn't mean it isn't nifty. 

Wishing your holiday season is filled with joy and happiness, and lots of pretty decorations!

I wonder if any of you have a tree with some not-quite-really-ornaments like mine?
Where are you spending the holidays? (at home, or on the road visiting?)

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